Archive for September, 2014

500 Years’ Worth of Book Illustrations Have Just Been Liberated From Print

SmartNews Keeping you current
500 Years’ Worth of Book Illustrations Have Just Been Liberated From Print
The internet’s about to get a wealth of illustrations from more than two million books
By Rachel Nuwer
smithsonian.com
September 5, 2014

The knowledge trapped in dusty print books isn’t just contained in their words—book illustrations, too, contain insights into past culture and psyche. But as the Washington Post points out, digitization efforts to date have focused mainly on printed text, rather than the illustrations that go with them. Now, a joint project between Georgetown University, Flickr and the Internet Archive aims to change that.

The researchers behind the effort plan to digitize images from some two million printed books, published over the past 500 years. So far, they have already added more than 2.5 million photos to the project’s Flickr page, all of which, the Washington Post adds, are licensed within the public domain.

As an added bonus, the illustrations—unlike many digitized text scans contained in PDF files—will soon be fully searchable. Kalev Leetaru, the Georgetown researcher behind the project, told the Washington Post that he will be releasing an app sometime in the next few weeks that will allow people to use keywords to search through what will eventually be around 10 million images. As Leetaru said, he hopes to create “a single massive gallery of our history” where “all of the world’s out-of-copyright book images” can reside.

Read more: http://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/500-years-worth-book-illustrations-have-just-been-liberated-print-180952621/#oISxx8ZvLtjWDVdp.99

Posted by
Michael J. Gomez
Alfred Wegener Institut für Polar- und Meeresforschung
Bremerhaven, Germany

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New Caledonia photos

I just returned home after four weeks of wonderful travel, culminating in the IAMSLIC Conference in Noumea, which was a gem. I selected some photos from the conference and the field trip and posted them on Flickr to add to those that have already been sent out by others. New Caledonia is a beautiful country and it was a joy to meet so many of our PIRG colleagues. Can’t wait to return to visit another country in the region in 2020.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/47089962@N00/sets/72157647783201616/

–Steve Watkins

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Blogging about the conference

I have been blogging about both my pre-conference vacation in New Zealand and the IAMSLIC conference in New Caledonia. I still have several more blogs to post for New Caledonia, but if you want to see more pictures from the conference, check it out at:

http://nznclibrarian.blogspot.co.nz

You can also sign up to receive new posts via email.

Joe Wible
Hopkins Marine Station

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Presenting the new Executive Board

Congratulations to Steve Watkins and Kristen LaBonte who were elected as President Elect (2016-2017) and Treasurer (2014-2016) respectively. They will join Guillermina Cosulich who is our new President, Kristen Anderson, President Elect (2015-2016) and Elizabeth Connor, Secretary (2013-2015). For their contact information, please see: http://www.iamslic.org/people/executive-board

The membership also voted in favour of amending the Bylaws. Thank you to the Bylaws Committee (Barbara Butler, Amy Butros, Angela Clark-Hughes) for their work in updating the Bylaws to align with our current practices.

It’s been a wonderful conference (thank you Mary-Clare and Guillermina!), and a lovely way to end my term as President. I’d like to thank the Officers, the Regional Group Representatives, the Committees and Task Forces, and the individuals who keep IAMSLIC moving forward.

IAMSLIC accomplished a lot this year! I encourage you to read my President’s Report and the annual reports of the groups and individuals who contribute to our organization. They are available at: http://www.iamslic.org/member-access/members-area/annual-reports

Sally Taylor, now a happy Past President

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40th Annual Conference: Day 5

Day 5: Thursday September 18
After Mary-Clare’s announcement that the name tags Proqest sent via a boat that encountered rough voyage arrived yesterday, we embarked on the final day.

Verenaisi Bavadra was first speaker of the day to talk about managing open data in the Pacific. USP and SPC fisheries use Greenstone but SPC/SOPAC uses  software that is more map friendly because they do mapping and bathymetry.   There are a number of open databases built and maintained by the different entities serving the region.  The challenges tend to revolve around the diversity of technology and the distance influencing communication.  There is often duplication because it’s hard to know who is doing what.  Also one has to consider the problem of knowing the quality of the data included.  There are many agencies all discussing the topic of open data but what is supposedly open is not always really open – some want to keep their data under “control.”    One of the directions planning is focusing on is utilization of cloud computing.

Dang Tai Hai Yen then told us about preservation of rare books in the Vietnam Institute of Oceanography by digitizing them. The library had been founded in 1922 and has books from the 1800’s.  Important rare books were identified for preservation as the environmental conditions and human impact on them has been quite detrimental.  For example, they have digitized all 32 volumes of the HMS Discovery reports.  This project was an important component of capacity building in Vietnam.  The benefits of IODE participation have been invaluable.

Next up was supposed to be Alice Endra of Uganda but she was unable to attend so Samuela gave the highlights of her presentation from the PowerPoint she had sent about digitizing historical fisheries information in her country.

I moderated the last session which started with Daryl Superio, information assistant at SEAFDAC.  He talked about the damage typhoon Yolanda (Haiyan) had on Phillipines. 195 mph winds. His study was conducted in Western Visayas region.  18% of the libraries had a disaster management plan (DMP) and 83% plan to have one! Major reason to not having plan is lack of personnel and second is no budget.  When asked about priority level of library to management in a disaster, a discussion ensued about library’s are not high on any priority list so we need to be ready to take care of ourselves.  We need to be prepared.

For the panel discussion on DMP, Lyra started with some training and preparedness that would be beneficial within each institution.  Have a plan and practice it.  Daryl talked about a fire at his library caused by lightening hitting an air conditioner unit which burst into flame.  The fire department response added water to the damage.  Then they had a flood in their storage room where their extra publications are stored when construction guys hit pipe to the staff toilet and broke it.  It’s not just typhoons and tsunamis we need to prepare for.  I was last speaker and attempted to legitimize my participation by showing pictures from my library’s flood.  I then handed out the disaster pocket plan form and directions on how to make canopies in case of leaking roofs.  You can find links to disaster planning tools here: http://library.manoa.hawaii.edu/departments/preservation/d-resources.html

Tea time!  Our last tea break offered the usual delicate pastries and today’s special? A canoe of tea sandwiches!  No, not a real canoe, but two great big loaves of bread that had been hollowed out and filled with assorted sandwiches cut in triangles.  We had our choice of salami, prosciutto, potted meat, or brie.  We have been totally spoiled!

Back to the meeting room for the second business meeting.  I was taking the minutes so you’ll have to look up the full report later.  For now I’ll let you know the highlights are the changing of the guard – Sally is now past president and Guillermina steps into the presidency.  It was announced that Steve Watkins is the jr. President-elect and Kristen LaBonte was elected treasurer.  Helen Wibley then invited us, on behalf of Maria Kalentsits, to Rome for IAMSLIC 2015, 7-11 September.  FAO will host.

Thus ended the 2014 conference!  The PIRG group had actually sung us farewell at the end of last nights banquet as some members departed earlier today.  This was truly an excellent conference – Mary-Clare and company really put on an awesome show.  Thanks to you all!

Due to technical difficulties the Aquatic Commons work party spent the afternoon lolling on the beach and some of us visited the aquarium.

Modestly submitted by Kris Anderson.  See you in Rome!

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Celebrating the 40th Birthday

Lovely!

Lovely!

Daryl Superio, official cake bearer

Daryl Superio, official cake bearer

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Another Petit Train photo you might enjoy

Le Petit Train

Joe Wible
Hopkins Marine Station

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Happy Birthday IAMSLIC!

Day 4: The Banquet 
It was a lovely evening in Noumea. The air slightly warm and a light breeze rustled through the palm fronds. I had watched the sky meander through its sunset colors, pinks and oranges, with the sinking sun backlighting the clouds. Beautiful.

I wandered over to the hotel where the annual banquet was to be held. We walked along the beach, hearing the oceans rhythmic shoosh of water up the sandy beach.  Along the way we passed groups of people playing planque – quiet chatter, the thump of the balls hitting the packed earth with an occasional clink as one ball hit another. Low laughter.  Oh so pleasant.

We were early so we hung out by the pool as everyone gathered. Finally Mary-Clare told us to be seated.  As wait staff poured wine, we were told a buffet awaited and we should help ourselves. As you know if you have been flowing these posts that we have eaten quite well this week.  This buffet was spectacular, a true feast – a true ocean feast!  

Two kinds of sashimi, whole crab, shrimp, oysters, green lipped mussels, salmon, sushi (5 kinds), crab salad, a beef salad, tuna tartare salad, deviled eggs topped with caviar,  potatoes gratin, green beans, white rice, rice pilaf, chicken with mushrooms, veal with mushrooms, fish with almonds, rolls and butter. 

Then the entertainment began.  Tahitian dancers who were AWESOME!  I’d like to say we all lost weight just watching the intensity with which they danced, but hat would be a lie.  The dancing was very engaging, in fact Ataban and Mark (Amy’s husband) got to dance with the girls and Kristen LaBonte and Jeanine danced with the boys.  But if you have any real questions, you should ask Vere as she has more intimate knowledge of the outfits being worn!  We admired the tattoos on both the men and women.

So full and then the dessert buffet was opened with cream puffs, giant chocolate filled macaroons, chocolate mousse, fruit tarts, fruit salad… But the HIGHLIGHT for our group was the entrance of the a BIRTHDAY cake with candles indicating 40 years and led by the PIRG members we sang Happy Birthday to IAMSLIC!  A most EXCELLENT celebration!!!

Humbly submitted by Kris Anderson

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40th Annual Conference: Day 4

Day 4: Wednesday September 17
Welcoming remarks from the current Officer in Charge of SPC lead the day.  He had been unavailable on Monday but so pleasantly made up for that today.  I was most taken with his point that innovation happens faster where there is lots of communication between many people and how much more difficult this is in the Pacific Region where there are small populations widely dispersed.  I also reiterate his point that climate change has huge impacts on lives so closely tied to the ocean.  

Moses Amos of the fisheries division of SPC was the keynote speaker.  He summarized the importance of offshore and inshore fisheries – while offshore may provide 90+% of a country’s GDP, the inshore fishery provides 90+% of the protein intake of the local populations.  16,000 direct jobs from fishery industry in the region.  The SPC fisheries division does scientific research, advocates for sustainability (including aquaculture), does stock assessment, monitors the fisheries, produces and dessimates information to all levels of users and management in the region.  A lively question and answer session followed the talk.

Guillermina Cosulich moderated the poster session – the posters are in the hall outside the meeting room but only one of the poster presenters is physically present – so Guillermina just summarized the posters submitted.  Kathy Heil was the only poster presenter to discuss her poster in person.  The posters were all very well done and we quite appreciate them.

Tea Break!!  Better yet, some last minute bidding in the Guin auction! Tea this morning included a platter of fancy little delights – some sweet and some savory.  One of the savory was a mini croissant with an itty bitty little sausage inside! Cute and delicious!! We were a bit shocked by one of the darling little cakes with fruit on top which looked so innocent but turned out to have a fairly high rum content!!! Meanwhile, back at the auction, I hope some more bidding happens today because I just realized how many items I’ve bid on!  Better go count my pennies…

Back in my chair to hear David Baca proposing partnerships with those persons or entites who manage the coastlines in our communities. They have created a repository called the Beach Management Information Portal.  As librarians we can offer research support and serve as a source of dissemination and storage of data and educational information to the public. Some examples are: reports, wading depths, history, sediment studies, bathymetric data, economic impacts, inventories, management plans.  If you have any or know of any such items for your neighborhood, contact David about inclusion in the repository.

Next up Kristen LaBonte explained a study she concocted and performed regarding data citation rates in GIS data in the marine sciences.  She talked about what data you should consider citing and why you should cite it..  Then talked about her study to see who, what, and where data is being cited in scientific literature.  Michigan State University library has a guide on how to cite GIS data. Kristen finished her talk with some ideas how librarians can promote data citation.  Contact her if you have questions or wait and check out her paper in the proceedings.

Last presentation of the day was Janet Webster, who with Barb Butler, looked into the present and future of Open Access (OA). There is no such thing as a free lunch!  Articles, depending on publishers, can be open (you can deposit to an IR anytime), delayed or embargo on OA, or a hybrid where there is a delay or author can pay and have immediate OA privileges.  Janet then talked about the predatory sites and publishers and introduced this site which attempts to track all such predatory and fake sites:  http://scholarlyoa.com
I was quite impressed that our friend Barb Butler has been elevated to a doctor and invited to be an editor by one of those predatory publishers – be sure and congratulate our pal Dr. Butler.  
This really is an interesting topic.  It’s not always feasible for an author to pay the publishing fees and it’s often confusing to even determine what author costs and rights will be.  As librarians, we need to be knowledgeable about the journals, about OA, and speak honestly to our constituents.
As an aside, Dr Barb Butler thinks we should start our own online journal of general interest on marine science to appeal to the public.  If you have ideas or comments, you should contact her at OIMB.

Lunch!!  Today we were blessed with chicken, a starch gratin – sweet yam, pumpkin, banana, potato – tuna tartare, stuffed tomato, rolls and butter. A tart fruit salad was the dessert offering.  So for third day in a row I’m stuffed!  Hope I can stay awake for the business and exec meetings this afternoon.

The Guin auction ended just before the business meeting.  The was a GREAT last minute scramble to get in final bids.  I’m keeping my fingers crossed that  I didn’t buy everything on the tables.  I do know that I did NOT get the ketchup chips as David made a preemptive bid of 5000 cfc ($50US)!  After all the bantering and handling of product, we remember that this auction benefits a great service and Mr Baca those will be the most appreciated tasty potato shards in IAMSLIC history!!!

See minutes and reports for the wildly exciting 1st business meeting.

Second Exec Meeting, see the website.

Brian will be showing interested participants how to navigate and post to the IAMSLIC website and blog.  Joe will be demonstrating and promoting the Aquatic Commons. Steve will be showing off the Z39.50 database and Helen Wibley will be helping with folks with ASFA.

Humbly submitted by Kris Anderson

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Why does Sally look so happy?

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Could it be because she will become “past president” in a few more days?

Joe Wible
Hopkins Marine Station

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