Archive for August, 2012

Tuesday, August 28, 2012 : Third Day

We’re diving right in to databases and discovery.  We start the day with the an unusual look at databases from Barb Butler & Janet Webster.  These collaborators entertain and enlighten with every presentation. Seems the “We’ve Always Done It This Way” crowd was a little contentious about having some of our traditional resources examined from different perspectives. Mostly because the resources don’t seem to add up from behind.  “Pay no attention to that man behind the curtain.”  More examination is necessary as we examine our practices to make sure they really are what is best for the patron, not what is most comfortable for us.

On the wild frontier of discovery, we learned about new discovery tools and how we are using them to help patrons find materials and resources without having the think too much.  The Google Search Box model is taking over the world.

Short break and we learn”How Chitons Explain the World”.  These interesting critters go by many names.  In Bermuda, they are called suckrocks.  (That’s kind of an insult in my family where we tell each other to ‘Go suck a rock’ when we’re angry with each other.)   In Alaska, the Katharina tunicata is called bidarki.  The Native Alaskans eat quite a few of these, though the meal is called a ‘shut up dinner’.   Lots of details about the many circumstances that have led to the critters becoming a primary food source rather than the other seafood choices of the area.  “Effective conservation methods requires understanding of past and causal conditions.”

 

After this wonderful talk, we snagged our box lunches and boarded the buses for the Alaska Sea Life Center in Seward, Alaska.  Driving along Turnagain Arm, we were lucky enough to spot beluga whales in the water.  Sorry, no pictures as they surface and dive too quickly for my shutter.  I do need to experiment more with my camera.

We arrived in Seward just a bit late, but still got to do everything on the schedule for the center. PUFFINS!!!  Yes, our first talk was the Puffin Experience.  We were introduced to Alcid biology and other interesting facts as well as Nemo the horned puffin, a rhinoceros auklet and Dot, the tufted puffin.

We went behind the scenes to visit the labs and tanks behind the walls the public sees.  A self-guided tour allowed us time to see all the exhibits and visit the gift shop.  A sumptuous dinner was served on the first floor among the underwater exhibits where several of us tried to capture pictures of the young, energetic harbor seal.  The little devil enjoyed teasing all the silly humans trying to get his picture.  And we loaded the bus for the 2.5 hour journey home, which turned out to be a bit longer due to road construction going on after dark.  A very late night, but well worth the visit and the drive as we got to see a lot of gorgeous scenery.

Lenora
StreamNet Regional Librarian
Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission
http://www.streamnetlibrary.org

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Monday, August 27, 2012: Second Day

IAMSLIC 2012

Monday, August 27, 2012

The day began with a welcome from the UAA Chancellor, Tom Case.  Opening comments by Amy Butros who is running in reverse, she began her presidency in Zanzibar and is ending in Anchorage.  Maria Kalentsis then gave us a few tips on organizing a fabulous conference and officially convened us all.

Had a quick break as we were already ahead of schedule.  Then Dr. Gunnar Knapp gave us an overview of Alaska fisheries and current policy issues.  He discussed the 3 types of fisheries (sport, commercial & subsistence) as well as the types of fish that are sought (salmon, herring, halibut, shellfish & groundfish).  The different policies used to keep those fisheries sustainable such as limited entry and individual fishing quotas. No system will be liked by the various parties managing the fisheries, but these policies are working so far for Alaska.

Another quick break and the 1st business meeting was called to order. Well, the membership did behave for the most part, I’m not sure we are ever an orderly bunch.  You’ll have to check the minutes when they are posted as I was busy setting up the Guin Auction. Had to print more auction bidding slips as I ran out and I thought I was going to have extra.  Ah, the generosity of librarians to help support their own.  I’ll post a full range of pictures.  Perhaps we should start a betting pool as well on which of the items will go for the highest bid.  Of course, we could also post a private auction or arrange for bidding for off-site folks in future auctions. Seriously, if you’re not here, there is some fabulous stuff up for grabs this year.  Folks have outdone themselves.

Bidding was opened on the Guin Auction as lunch was served. After a lunch consisting of a baked potato bar, soup & chili (awesome chili), we moved back to our spots to listen to exciting innovations in patron instruction.  Michelle Leonard worked on an NSF grant to develop a computer game to teach researchers (students & faculty) about ethical research.  She also showed us some of the other tools for conducting ethical research and teaching scientists about various tasks that some faculty forget students don’t already know.  Sorry, I wasn’t born with the knowledge of how to keep a notebook. Not that I know now as I was never taught.

Anyway, we moved on to Elizabeth Connor talking about QR codes: 1. why the are useful 2. how to create them.  They are fun.  You could have a lot of fun with plain text ones in your library as well as posting contact information, hours, or other useful information in various places around the library.  You can post maps that students or others can download to their smartphones.  Would be interesting to see if we could add QR codes to catalog records that geolocate books like geocaches in the library.  I think I might most a few around the library as plain text links with jokes about why the salmon crossed the road.  No, of course, I don’t know why the salmon crossed the road. I don’t think they know. Salmon brains are really quite small and they don’t think much.

Another break with veggies & dip.  THey are sooo helping me stick to a better diet. Thank you very much.

We returned to presentations on the importance of staying relevant and how this problem really is global for libraries all over the world.  Perhaps folks should chime in on the email list when they have a bright idea for sharing information or new services the library can pursue in order to draw attention to our other services.  Don’t wait for the Green Flash or conference, get the word out.  Save a colleague!

Our afternoon invited speaker was AWESOME.  Environmental justice with worldwide case studies and contaminants in Alaska. Dr Frank von Hippel is an ecotoxicologist at the university.  His presentation was riveting. Absolutely riveting.  The damage we have done as humans in places where our fellow humans are affected. The social injustices, the economic costs. Wow.  But there is hope.  We can figure out where things are going wrong, train and use citizen scientists to monitor conditions, invest in clean up of toxics and make the world a better place.

And, we were free for the day.  A large group took off for The Bridge Restaurant with Kristen C. of the vendor variety serving as host to the party.  THANK YOU!!!    Not sure I can give more detail than that, but they are a well-known publisher (T.R.)

 

Should thank all of our conference sponsors, Ebsco, Proquest, Inter-Research, Thomson-Reuters, IODE, UAA, Harrassowitz, cruiseabout, Discovery Car Hire Australia, Dejan Seo, iSelect, Centrepoint Finance, OzForex & ninfold Cloud Computing. Without their generous support, we wouldn’t really be able to afford to put on such great conferences.  Donations by local companies for the Guin Auction were from: Arctic Office Products, Humpy’s Great Alaskan Ale House, Kobuk Coffee Company, Moose’s Tooth Pub & Pizzeria & the UAA bookstore.

Lenora
StreamNet Regional Librarian
Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission
http://www.streamnetlibrary.org

 

PS Many of us are disappointed that we have not seen any wildlife beyond ducks in the lake behind the hotel. But we’re still on the lookout for the charismatic megafauna we were practically promised by the Alaska advertising.

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Sunday August 26, 2012 : First Day

IAMSLIC 2012

Sunday, August 26, 2012

The day began a bit early as we all rose for breakfast and then congregated at the door of the Magic Bus to begin our field trip to the Alaska Native Heritage Center.  Not a very long drive, but enough time to admire the snow-sprinkled mountains and the sun peeking through the clouds to highlight the alpine meadows climbing up the sides of the mountains.  Green is an abundant color, though we did notice that the leaves are already starting to turn to fall here in the last frontier.

We arrived at the Center to be greeted by our guides and begin our private guided tours through the center.   The elders of the natives from the Anchorage area were asked for permission and blessings to build this center which seeks to educate the world about the rich cultural heritage of these tribes. Not much to the main building, we hustled outside to walk through the largest part of the center which features small, replica villages from each of the 5 language groups that the Alaska Natives are grouped into.  We were split into two groups, and Casey led us away.   Walking the trail through the villages, Casey told us stories, answered questions and shared his vast knowledge of all the cultures.  The rhythm & cadence combine with the pitch of his voice provided a fabulous.  Casey is from the Cupik tribe and regaled us with stories of how he grew up and even how he still goes home to hunt.  We learned history & traditions as well as how the people currently live in the most remote areas of Alaska.

We returned to the main building which houses the Hall of Cultures, theatre & gift shop.  A craft fair was being held in the Hall of Cultures with vendors selling handmade items.  The theatre is a stage to show off cultural traditions including games/sports, singing & dancing.  There was a demonstration of boys kicking a ball high in the air and then Haida people came out to showcase songs and dances.  Their regalia includes the famous button blankets. The end of our tour came at the end of the singing & dancing, so we all sashayed out to the bus to the beat of the drum.  So sad that the bus back to the hotel was not the Magic Bus.  Oh well.

From the hotel, we all took off for various destinations for lunch with downtown being the most popular.  We split as some had stomachs eating through their abdominal walls, so they found a restaurant right away.  Others decided to wait a bit and took the one hour Historic Anchorage Trolley tour.  The downtown Anchorage Visitors’ Center has a shuttle pick up and drop off.  Most of the tourist attractions provide free shuttles to their sites for tourists.  Very convenient.

After a tasty caribou/reindeer cheeseburger with salad (oh, I’m being good), my group walked around downtown to various cheap & tacky (some not-so-tacky but out of my price range) tourist shops to gather souvenirs.  Our adventure took longer than we thought as we arrived back at the hotel with just enough time to change and make our way over to the Welcome Reception at the Carr Gottstein Lobby at the Alaska Pacific University campus.  And again, the food was most excellent.  Sort of an open bar, but the group must be slowing down as there were still some full bottles when I left at 730.  

So, there were lots of hugging and excitement as we all greeted those who visit with us sporadically as well as those who we get to see annually.  During the dinner, the local hosts had door prizes.  Thanx for the chocolate covered espresso beans.  I do love them so.

I fell into the comfy bed with a sigh and lost myself to dreams of seeing wild moose & bears & other wildlife.

https://www.facebook.com/groups/97187258540/  Join the IAMSLIC group on Facebook for all the pictures.  I’m disillusioned with Flickr so will be searching for another photo-sharing service. Suggestions are welcome.  la.oftedahl@comcast.net

 

Lenora
StreamNet Regional Librarian
Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission
http://www.streamnetlibrary.org

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IAMSLIC IODE Training Survey Reopened!

Dear IAMSLIC Members – All of you-not just conference attendees!

Please take some time to take the Training Survey – we would like to know your needs, opinions and of course if you would like to volunteer to instruct , we would like that information as well!

As you know, an agreement was signed between IOC/IODE and IAMSLIC to promote cooperations between the two organizations.  IODE has been successfully running a training programme for many years and has involved some really eminent librarians and information specialists as lecturers….ILMS creators, ASFA people etc.  At a time when the need for and role of librarians is put into question, we need to make sure that our professional community has the best possible and most up to date know-how.  Additionally, we should demonstrate that we have much to offer, not only in terms of information management as we know and love it, but also as perhaps data managers, embedded librarians and ?  In cooperation with IODE and other partners, we can provide training for these emerging roles in our community.

I am pleased to report also that, IODE would sponsor training, not only  to developing countries, but would set aside some funding for participants from developed countries (perhaps limited to IAMSLIC members).

In order to identify the necessary training topics IAMSLIC and IODE posted an online survey in July.  Unfortunately (probably due to Summer holidays) we did not receive many responses.  This training can be an important benefit to you and the IAMSLIC community.  Please take some time – less that 10 minutes- to answer this survey- so that IAMSLIC and IODE can jointly work out a training program for 2012-2014 – that will benefit all of us.

The survey can be found at:  https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/iamslic_iode2012

We will leave the survey open through September 15th.

The results will be openly posted.

(please note that this survey will not expose an individual’s answers)

Thank you!    Linda Pikula

 

 

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